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  • Animal Testing | Genetech

    Animal Testing What is Parvovirus and why is early diagnosis essential? Canine Parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious pathogen primarily affecting dogs. This virus can also infect other mammals including cats. If untreated, the risk of death may be high. Thus, a rapid and early diagnosis could save their lives. ​ Detection of the virus can help you select an appropriate treatment regimen for your animals, prevent the spread of the virus and save them from secondary infections. Why we recommend a PCR test over an ELISA test The sensitivity of an ELISA test depends on the Ag/Ab concentration and the availability. Thus, it could lead to false positive or negative results. In contrast, our PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) test detects the viral genome and produces no false positive or negative results. This is because it is dependent on the availability of the virus but not its products or Abs. The positive result of an ELISA test can be caused by organisms other than the target. On the other hand, our PCR test detects genetic sequences unique to the target pathogen. Therefore, its specificity is much higher than an ELISA test. The accuracy of the ELISA test varies, and it depends on the Ag/Ab availability. Our PCR test offers a consistent accuracy of 99%. What is tick fever and why may early detection be crucial? Tick fever is a common canine disease in Sri Lanka which is caused through the bite of an infected tick carrying an insidious and deadly organism. Scientifically, it is known as Canine Ehrlichiosis and Canine Babesiosis. ​ Early detection may prevent the dog from experiencing severe anemic conditions caused by the disease due to the highly pathogenic nature of it. Furthermore, the specific detection will help choose a suitable treatment regimen for your dog. Why microscopy and antibody tests are not ideal Some stages of the parasite life cycle cannot be observed through the microscope. Therefore, the probability of obtaining false results is high. It takes several days to develop antibodies against a certain infection in the body. Hence, it is difficult to diagnose the infection early. Antibodies may be present in the body even after the disease is cured. Thus, if the test is done after the infection is cured, the result may be false positive. What we offer We are the first firm to provide a PCR based animal disease testing service in Sri Lanka. We offer tests which detect Canine Parvovirus, Canine Distemper, Canine Babesiosis and Canine Ehrlichiosis. In addition to animal disease testing, we provide a cattle parentage testing service through the use of DNA typing. Contact us View price list

  • Job Vacancies | Genetech

    Job Vacancies Apologies - We are no longer accepting any job applications at this time. Please check again later. ​ You can follow our Facebook page and LinkedIn page to stay updated on job opportunities and what we do at Genetech.

  • Conference Papers and Communications - 2 | Genetech

    Conference Papers and Communications Page 2 of 2 De Silva, A. D., Perera, N., Abeysekera, D. M. & Elvitigala, J. P. (2009) Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB) isolates in Sri Lanka utilizing the Mycobaterium interspersed repetitive units(MIRU) typing method. Respire, Inaugural symposium of the association of pulmonologists. De Silva, A. D., Samarasinghe, K. S. R. G. S. L., Abeysekera, D. M. & Elvitigala, J. P. (2009) Screening for IS6110 zero copy number strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sri Lanka Genetech Research Institute, Colombo 8, Chest Hospital, Welisara. The Bulletin of the Sri Lanka College of Microbiologists, volume 7, Issue 1. Muthunayake, T., Dangalle, C., Fernandopulle, N. & Weerakoon, D. (2009) Genetic analysis of morphologically non-identifiable translocated Puntius bandula population at Salgala using CO1 region of mt DNA. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Forestry and Environment Symposium, University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Sri Lanka. 1 (1), 66. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/335926117_Genetic_analysis_of_morphologically_non-identifiable_translocated_Puntius_bandula_population_at_Salgala_using_CO1_region_of_mtDNA Wickramasinghe, E. D. T. S. L., Fernandopulle, N. D. & Hettiarachchi, P. L. L. (2009) DNA barcoding of Sri Lankan Tea - A method to secure ownership in the international trade. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Forestry and Environment Symposium, University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Sri Lanka. 1 (1), 68. Samaradivakara, S., Gunasekera, I., Mendis, B., Karunaratne, U., Jayathunga, T., Sledgers, R. & Fernandopulle, N. (2009) Preliminary study on DNA barcoding of cinnamon varieties in Sri Lanka. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Forestry and Environment Symposium, University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Sri Lanka. 1 (1), 69-70. Fernando, A., Samaradivakara, S., De Silva, A. D., Baranage, G., Herath, I., Fernandopulle, N. D., Padmalal, K. & Ranawaka, G. R. R. (2009) DNA Barcoding of the Sri Lankan Slender Loris (Loris tardigradus or Loris lydekkerianus?) A preliminary report. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Forestry and Environment Symposium, University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Sri Lanka. 1 (1), 74. Available from: http://repository.ou.ac.lk/handle/94ousl/1845 Rajasinghe, M. H. L. D., Fernandopulle, N. & Perera, A. L. T. (2009) Detection of Genetically Modified Soy Food in Sri Lankan Supermarket, Paper Presented at the Proceedings of the Peradeniya, University Research Sessions, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.Vol:14 (1) pp: 16-18. Perera, A. N. K., Logendra, B., Fernandopulle, N. D. & Attanayaka, D. P. S. T. G. (2009) Development of a PCR-based molecular Detection Assay for Thielaviopsis paradoxa in Coconut Fibre Dust. Proceedings of 9th Agricultural Research Symposium, Wayamba University of Sri Lanka. 326-331. Tissera, H. A., De Silva, A. D., Abeysinghe, M. R. N., de Silva, A. M., Palihawadana, P., Gunasena, S., Tam, C. C., Gamage, T. M., De Silva, T., Rajapaksa, L. C., Amarasinghe, A., Letson, G. W. & Margolis, H. S. (2009) Dengue Surveillance in Colombo, Sri Lanka: Baseline seroprevalence among children. Procedia in Vaccinology . 2(1) 110–114. Available from: doi: 10.1016/j.provac.2010.03.020 Gunathilaka, P. V. V. W., Fernandopulle, N. D. & Attanayaka, D. P. S. T. G. (2007) Development of an in-house method for purification and characterization of Taq DNA polymerase. Proceedings of 7th Agricultural Research Symposium, Wayamba University of Sri Lanka. 1 (1), 27-31. Fernandopulle, N. D. (2007) DNA typing for forensic and civil casework in Sri Lanka; a critical review. Proceedings of the 9th Indo-Pacific Congress on Legal Medicine & Forensic Sciences. Illeperuma, R. J. (2007) Y-Chromosome and Mitochondrial DNA reference data bases for Sri Lankan Human Population, 9th Indo-Pacific Congress on Legal Medicine & Forensic Sciences. OP-72 p83. Markalanda, D. A., Illeperuma, R. J. & Fernandopulle, N. D. (2007) Establishment of a Differential extraction of Male and Female DNA from sexual assault samples - 9th Indo-Pacific Congress on Legal Medicine & Forensic Sciences. Fernandopulle, D. N., Senevirathna, D. B., Ranaweera, D. M., Abeysekara, D., Perera, N., Kanakaratne, N., Jayasinghe, S., Samaraweera, P. & De Silva, A. (2007) Detection of HCV Genotypes among Sri Lankan Patients by Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The Bulletin of the Sri Lanka College of Microbiologists Vol 5. Seneviratne, D. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2006) Development of a low-cost in-house RT-PCR assay for the detection of hepatitis C virus. Annual Sessions of the Post Graduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Abbas, R., Senevirathne, D., Ranaweera, D. & Fernandopulle, N. D. (2006) DNA-based detection of Herpes Simplex virus 1 and 2 in clinical samples and its usefulness as a screening test for viral encephalitis. Proceedings of the 62nd Annual Sessions of the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science. Wahala, M., Messer, W., Kanakaratne, N., Perera, N., Seneviratne, D., Ranawake, G. R., Shahani, A., Ruberu, D., Gunasekera, M. B. & De Silva, A. M. (2005) Virological parameters of recent dengue hemorrhagic fever outbreak in Sri Lanka. Annual sessions of PUBMED, National institutes of Health, USA. Seneviratne, D., Gamage, P., Baranage, G., Jayasinghe, S., Shahani, A., Somaiah, S., Fernandopulle, N. D. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2004). Screening for Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection by an in-house reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) based assay (2004) The Bulletin of the Sri Lanka College of Microbiologists Vol 2 (1). Fernandopulle, N. D., De Silva, V., Perera, N., Jayathilake, M. M., Pieris, D., Balawardana, J., Perera, M. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2004) Screening for Philadelphia Chromosome by an in-house Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) based assay. Proceedings of the 60th Annual Sessions of the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science. Illeperuma, R. J., Fernandopulle, N. D., Senevirathna, D., Baranage, G., Perera, N. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2004). A comparison of theoretical and observed statistical data in paternity testing by DNA analysis. Proceedings of the 60th Annual Sessions of the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science. Jayathilaka, S., Weerasinghe, R. & Fernandopulle, N. (2004) Predicting ethnic origin from DNA by neural networks. Proceedings of the 6th International Information Technology Conference IITC 2004, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Baranage, G., Seneviratne, D., Gamage, P., Ranawaka, G., Perera, N., Illeperuma, R., Ruberu, D., Shahani, A. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2004) Screening of febrile cases for early diagnosis of dengue and identification of dengue virus type using in-house diagnostic kits based on polymerase chain reaction. The Bulletin of the Sri Lanka College of Microbiologists Vol 2 (1). Illeperuma, R. J., Fernandopulle, N. D., Senevirathna, D., Baranage, G., Perera, N. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2004) DNA-based testing as a social phenomenon in Sri Lanka. Proceedings of the 60th Annual Sessions of the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science. Ranawaka, G. R., Gamage, P., De Silva, V., Fernando, A., Seneviratne, D. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2003) Evaluation of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-agarose gel electrophoresis assay with a PCR-hybridization assay for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Proceedings of the 59th Annual Sessions of the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science. Gamage, P., Seneviratne, D., Herath, C. A., Fernandopulle, N. D. & Gunasekera, M. B. (2003) Polymerase chain reaction based detection of cytomegalovirus infection in Sri Lanka. Proceedings of the 59th Annual Sessions of the Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science. ​ ​ 1 2

  • Research Policies | Genetech

    GRI Research Policies for External Researchers Genetech offers scientific expertise, technical services and laboratory facilities for research projects. External researchers will have access to all the following services: ​ Bench space and access to all equipment at GRI Scientific and technical expertise of GRI permanent staff Common chemicals and supplies Assistance in ordering and receiving research supplies Library, computer and internet facilities at GRI Short term sample storage at 4 C, -20 C and -80 C. Coordination of international shipment of specimen (subject to local and international export/import regulations) Above services can be obtained under following broad categories, with the flexibility to accommodate the individual researcher's requirements.

  • FAQs | Genetech

    Frequently Asked Questions What are the internships/training programmes/courses currently being offered at Genetech? ​ A summary of the internships/training programmes/courses offered is given in the following document. Are foreigners eligible to enrol in an internship/training programme/course at Genetech? Is there a difference in programme/course fee? ​ Yes, we warmly welcome students from all over the world to enrol in our internships/training programmes/courses. For international students requiring a visa to enter Sri Lanka, we would be delighted to provide a letter confirming your enrolment. There is no difference in the fee charged. What is the duration of the internships/programmes/courses offered and on what days will these be conducted? ​ They are normally held on consecutive working days over the stipulated duration (excluding holidays and weekends) from 9.30am to 4.30pm. ​ *Please note that there can be slight modifications to the times and dates specified. What are the prerequisite qualifications required to enrol in an internship/training programme/course at Genetech? ​ No prerequisite qualifications are required to enrol in any internship/training programme/course at Genetech. Enrolment can be done by paying the required fee on or before the starting date and filling in a form with your details on the starting date. Do you charge an extra registration fee? ​ No, 10% of the final fee is normally taken as the registration fee in order to reserve your place for the relevant internship/programme/course as limited places will be available, this fee is non-refundable and needs to be paid before five working days of the scheduled start date. Do you offer any paid internships or any training programmes/courses free of charge or discounted rates? ​ No, we do not offer any paid internships or training programmes/courses free of charge or at discounted rates. Do you offer accommodation, meals and/or transport services for trainees/interns? ​ We do not offer accommodation, meals or transport services to participants at this time. How can I receive more information or ask specific questions about the available internships/training programmes/courses at Genetech? ​ Further queries can be sent to the Genetech School of Gene Technology by contacting +94112696992 or via the official email address info@genetechsrilanka.com . Can I carry out my research work at Genetech? ​ Yes, we can provide the facilities to accommodate undergraduate, postgraduate and PhD research work related to the Molecular Biology and Gene Technology. Do you offer acceptance letters for visa applications? ​ Yes, contact info@genetechsrilanka.com for more information.

  • DNA Typing Services | Genetech

    DNA Typing Services Child custody and maintenance: In cases where one parent is claiming the custody and maintenance of a child and the other parent is refusing to accept parentage. Proof of adultery: Especially in divorce cases where the paternity of the child is suspect, and the wife is being accused of adultery, DNA typing can be used to determine whether the husband is the father of the child. Rape, which has resulted in pregnancy: DNA typing of tissue samples from the mother, child and suspected offender can be analysed to determine whether he is the father of the child. Testamentary cases: When a deceased person's wealth is to be distributed among his or her heirs, it is sometimes necessary to determine who the heirs are. DNA typing can be used to prove blood relationship to the deceased individual. Immigration: Individuals and families interested in establishing a proven biological link to their relatives ultimately enhance their chances of a successful application for immigration. Identity testing in cases involving immigration may include answering questions of paternity, maternity, and sibling relationships. Twin studies: DNA typing can be used to determine whether twins are identical or not. Identification of mutilated bodies: When a deceased person's body is mutilated and cannot be identified directly, such as in fire, vehicle accidents, bomb blasts, or due to prolonged burial, it is possible to identify these persons by comparing their DNA profiles with that of their close relatives'. Murder, violent assault, robbery: In these cases, a sample of tissue from the criminal is sometimes found at the scene of the crime, and if there is a suspect, DNA typing can very accurately determine whether the sample of tissue belongs to the suspect, thereby linking the suspect to the crime. Furthermore, a sample of tissue from the victim may be found on the criminal (such as blood stains on the criminal's clothing). Similarly, DNA typing can be used to determine whether the sample of tissue belongs to the victim in such cases, thereby connecting the suspect to the victim. Rape and other sexual offences: In these cases, semen and saliva samples may be obtained from the body and clothing of the victim. DNA typing can be used to determine whether the sample of tissue belongs to the suspect, thereby linking the suspect to the crime. In such cases, DNA typing can be used very effectively to identify the criminal only if the offense is reported immediately, and DNA samples are taken as soon as possible. Establishment of identity in insurance claims: It is often necessary to establish the identity of a claimant in life insurance claims. DNA typing can determine the relationship of the claimant to the insured individual. DNA typing is also extremely effective in identifying individuals who have died in accidents or by other causes, and whose bodies have been severely mutilated making conventional identification impossible. Hence, DNA typing can be used to confirm the death of the insured person. Establishment of a criminal DNA profile data bank: Many countries have enacted legislation to establish a DNA databank, containing profiles from individuals convicted of specific crimes, especially violent crimes and sexual offences. Law enforcement agencies search these databanks for matches with DNA profiles from biological evidence of unsolved crimes. Using these databanks, law enforcement agencies have been successful in identifying suspects in cases thought to be unsolvable. Such databases are also a powerful deterrent to crime because the criminal knows that his DNA profile is on record. ​

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